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Archiver > GAMEL > 1998-11 > 0910187551


From: <>
Subject: [GAMEL-L] John S. Gammill
Date: Wed, 4 Nov 1998 08:52:31 EST


Center Gets $1 Million for Research
10/12/1990

Officials of Reserve National Insurance Co. of Oklahoma City have donated $1
million to the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center to establish an
endowed chair in polycystic kidney research and to set up a special research
fund.

Dr. Edward N. Brandt Jr., executive dean of OU's College of Medicine, said
half of the money will be placed in a special fund that will support research
into polycystic kidney disease.

The remaining $500,000 will be used to help establish a $1 million research
professorship, to be named the John S. Gammill Chair in Polycystic Kidney
Research, in honor of the founder, president and chairman of the board of
Reserve National Insurance Co., Brandt said.

To complete the $1 million endowment needed for the new research chair, OU
officials have requested $500,000 in state matching funds under the endowed
chair program administered by the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education,
Brandt said.

Polycystic kidney disease is an abnormal condition in which the kidneys become
enlarged and develop cysts. The disease is inherited, progressive and
currently incurable, Brandt said.

"We hope this will be a small contribution to the search for the cure of a
disease which affects 500,000 people in the United States annually," John S.
Gammill said when he recently presented the $1 million gift to OU officials.
"I have a vested interest in that I have the disease as do both of my sons,
and my father died of it."

Although polycystic kidney disease is the primary health problem, other
manifestations can include liver cysts, diverticulosis, abdominal aortic
aneurysms, hypertension and cardiac valvular abnormalities, Gammill said.

"I don't know of any better place that we can put our money to work than right
here in our hometown under the auspices of the OU Health Sciences Center," he
said. "We know it will be in good hands."

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